lyme en hormonen

Wetenschappelijke onderwerpen die betrekking hebben op de ziekte van Lyme, zoals wetenschappelijke medische publicaties en artikelen die worden ondersteund door dergelijke publicaties.
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vonneke
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Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Berichtdoor vonneke » Zo 2 Sep 2007 10:38

LYME DISEASE and it’s connection to THYROID/ADRENAL PROBLEMS

John D. Bleiweiss, M.D., a Lyme Disease specialist, states, “Increasingly, I am encountering thyroid disease in LD. A local endocrinologist has remarked to me privately that the incidence of thyroid involvement in LD may be greater than expected from the normal population.” He goes on to say, “In many of these patients, the thyroid dysfunction was seen to originate in the pituitary or hypothalmus. Remaining alert to the possibility of thyroid disease is essential because there can be considerable clinical overlap with LD. Subacute thyroiditis is the most prevalent thyroid phenomenon I see in LD. Hypoadrenalism can uncommonly develop: http://www.lymenet.de/lymcheck.html#essay


Dr. James Howenstine, a Lyme Disease expert, states, “Profound dysfunction of the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid glands and gonads is very common in mycoplasmal, fungal, and anerobic bacterial infections. http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/ar ... read=51356 He goes on to say, “There is considerable evidence that many patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Lyme disease have an infectious disease. Lyme disease needs to be considered in every patient with a chronic illness.”

http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lyme-disease/

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Kaja
Berichten: 52
Lid geworden op: Vr 17 Aug 2007 21:28

Berichtdoor Kaja » Ma 3 Sep 2007 13:13

Prettig dat er veel info te vinden is. het is niet dat ik geen engels lezen kan, maar mijn brein kost het op dit moment zoveel extra energie om te kunnen focussen dat het het ontcjiferen van wat ze nu precies bedoelen doodvermoeiend is. Zijn deze artikelen niet in het nederlands ergens te vinden?

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vonneke
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Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Za 9 Feb 2008 21:27

Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2003;103(6):4-6. Links

The study of adaptation syndrome in mixed-infection of tick-borne encephalitis and borreliosis in children
[Article in Russian]


Subbotin AV, Poponnikova TV, Zinchuk SF.
Twenty two children with mixed-infection of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and ixodic tick borreliosis (ITB) were studied. Blood hydrocortisone level was changed in 94.5% of the cases. The most significant activation of hydrocortisone secretion in combination with the most pronounced and prolonged general brain manifestations, was detected in infants. Blood hydrocortisone level correlated with clinical symptoms of combined TBE and ITB infections. Along with higher hydrocortisone level, down-regulation of production of antibodies both to B. burgdorferi and to TBE virus was specific for all children studied.

PMID: 12872617

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vonneke
Berichten: 7127
Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Za 9 Feb 2008 21:28

Rev Neurol. 2003 Apr 16-30;36(8):727-9. Links

Pseudotumour cerebri in a patient with Lyme disease and hypothyroidism
][Article in Spanish]


García-Moreno JM, Borobio-Enciso MV, Angulo-Fraile S, Izquierdo G.
Unidad de Esclerosis Múltiple, Servicios de Nurología, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. sinue@arrakis.es

INTRODUCTION: Lyme disease is a complex infectious disease affecting multiple organic systems. The most frequent complications are of a dermatological, rheumatological, ophthalmological, cardiac and neurological nature. Among the neurological complications, pseudotumour cerebri is considered to be a rare manifestation of the disease. Hypothyroidism, however, is known to be only infrequently associated to pseudotumour cerebri. Paparone recently reported a case in which Lyme disease and primary hypothyroidism were concurrent, and Becker and Trock described the case of three patients with concurrent thyrotoxicosis and Lyme disease. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a 19 year old female with pseudotumour cerebri and hypothyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis, which improved after treating her for concomitant Lyme. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest there is a common aetiopathogenic connection between the three processes through autoimmune thyroiditis triggered by Borrelia burgdorferi. Thus, in this patient, the pseudotumour cerebri could be due to either a direct mechanism, triggered by B. burgdorferi, or indirectly, through hypothyroidism secondary to thyroiditis induced by B. burgdorferi, or perhaps to both mechanisms. It might be wise to consider infection by B. burgdorferi in patients with pseudotumour cerebri or thyroiditis coming from areas in which Lyme disease is endemic

PMID: 12717650

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vonneke
Berichten: 7127
Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Za 9 Feb 2008 21:29

J Am Osteopath Assoc. 1995 Jul;95(7):435-7. Links

Hypothyroidism with concurrent Lyme disease.

Paparone PW.

Lyme Disease Center for South Jersey, Absecon 08201, USA.

Lyme disease can be seen as localized, disseminated, acute, or chronic and can mimic other, more serious diseases. Even though it is a multisystemic illness, very few spirochetes are present; yet, once established in the host, it can persist for years. The antibody response is slow and variable, and the spirochete is difficult to isolate from clinical specimens, even those obtained from the pathognomonic skin lesion. These variables, together with nonspecific symptoms, make the diagnosis of Lyme disease difficult. The author describes an unusual case of Lyme disease superimposed on severe primary hypothyroidism in which the thyroid disorder was so advanced and pronounced that the diagnosis of Borrelia infection could easily have been missed.

PMID: 7642407

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vonneke
Berichten: 7127
Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Za 9 Feb 2008 21:29

Eur J Endocrinol. 2008 Jan;158(1):3-9. Links

Hypothalamic-pituitary insufficiency following infectious diseases of the central nervous system.

Schaefer S, Boegershausen N, Meyer S, Ivan D, Schepelmann K, Kann PH.
Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Philipps University Hospital, Baldingerstrasse, D-35033 Marburg, Germany. stscha@med.uni-marburg.de <stscha@med.uni-marburg.de>

OBJECTIVE: Hypothalamic-pituitary insufficiency may have diverse causes. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of hypothalamic-pituitary insufficiency in patients with previous infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) of different etiologies and mild-to-moderate clinical course. DESIGN: Patient series. Basal and stimulated (insulin tolerance test) pituitary function testing was performed in 19 patients with previous neuroborreliosis, encephalitis, or meningitis following an interval of between 10 and 56 months (mean 26.1+/-13.1 months) after the acute event. RESULTS: Four patients (21%; two males, two females) showed an isolated corticotropic insufficiency (peak cortisol <181.25 microg/l during the insulin tolerance test). Two patients (11%, males) showed borderline gonadotropic insufficiency (basal testosterone between 2.4 and 3.0 microg/l). No patient had somatotropic or thyrotropic insufficiency or evidence for diabetes insipidus; all had prolactin concentrations within the reference range. CONCLUSIONS: Hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction and especially isolated corticotropic insufficiency may develop in a relevant proportion of patients after infectious diseases of the CNS.

PMID: 18166811

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vonneke
Berichten: 7127
Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Zo 16 Mar 2008 17:52

Andrologia. 2002 Jun;34(3):162-3. Links

Late Lyme disease masking a non-functioning adenoma of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.

Möhrenschlager M, Köhn FM, Bauer M, Schaaf L, Hofmann H, Ring J.
Department of Dermatology and Allergy Biederstein, Technical University of Munich, Germany. m.moehrenschlager@lrz.tum.de

PMID: 12059811

adenoom= een goedaardig gezwel uitgaande van een klier

anterior lobe= hypofysevoorkwab

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypofyse

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vonneke
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Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Ma 12 Mei 2008 14:51

Thyroid. 2004 Nov;14(11):964-6. Links

Homologies between proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi and thyroid autoantigens.

Benvenga S, Guarneri F, Vaccaro M, Santarpia L, Trimarchi F.
Sezione di Endocrinologia del Dipartimento Clinico Sperimentale di Medicina e Farmacologia, Università di Messina, Messina, Italy. s.benvenga@me.nettuno.it

Subclinical exposure to microbic antigens that share amino acid sequence homology with self antigens might trigger autoimmune diseases in genetically predisposed individuals via molecular mimicry. Genetic predisposition to Graves' disease (GD) or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is conferred by HLA loci DR3 or DR5, respectively. Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) outer proteins (YOPs) are candidate triggers based on the high prevalence of serum antibodies (Ab) against YOPs in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) and reactivity of these Ab with hTSH-R, suggesting homology between YOPs and hTSH-R. We have reported previously that the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) could be another trigger. We have explored further the homology of hTSH-R with YE and Bb. Using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), we found four matches with YE and five matches with Bb . Residues 22-272, 186-330, 319-363 and 684-749 of hTSH-R matched YopM, Ysp, exopolygalacturonase and SpyA of YE (identity 23-31%, similarity 40-48%). Residues 112-205, 127-150, 141-260, 299-383 and 620-697 of hTSH-R matched outer surface protein A, flagellar motor rotation protein A, two hypothetical proteins (BBG02 and BBJ08) and DNA recombinase/ATP dependent helicase of Borrelia (identity 27-50%, similarity 40-75%). Interestingly, the above hTSH-R regions coincide with (or include) known human T-cell epitopes: aa 52-71, 140-176, 240-270, 340-380 and 441-661. Our data strengthen the hypothesis of Bb and YE as environmental triggers of AITD in genetically predisposed persons through molecular mimicry mechanisms.

PMID: 15671776

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vonneke
Berichten: 7127
Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Di 13 Jan 2009 22:30

Wat Connie Strassheim beschrijft over Lyme, de schildklier en de bijnieren is zo'n beetje wat er met mijn oudste dochter ook aan de hand is.


http://www.wellsphere.com/lyme-disease- ... ase/407807


Treating The Thyroid and Adrenal Glands In Lyme Disease


If you're new to the world of Lyme disease and the labyrinths of research that it takes a sufferer into, then you may not know that balancing the endocrine system is important. If not, you will soon learn that fixing endocrine problems is vital for healing, and that giving a little TLC to the thyroid and adrenal glands, in particular, is most important.

Balancing the system is tricky. I don't know if it's even possible as long as infections and trauma are present; however, if you leave your hormones to their own devices amidst such crises, you're likely to really fall apart, or at least feel as though you are. Restoring some measure of balance to a flailing system will enable you to function and fight Lyme disease better.

This usually starts with the adrenal glands. No, I don't mean the thyroid, I mean the ADRENALS. Many physicians and patients start on the wrong end of things by first giving the body thyroid hormone, but this isn't usually how it should be done.

Why? In Lyme disease and chronic illness, the thyroid often malfunctions as a result of the adrenal glands, which are pooped from having to deal with so many bugs, toxins and stress. Treating the thyroid first puts greater stress on the adrenal glands, which then exacerbates the whole endocrine problem. Not treating the thyroid, however, can also stress the adrenals, but if you sense you have adrenal fatigue, it's best to deal with this problem first.

How do you know if you have adrenal fatigue? While some symptoms of hypothyroidism (most chronic Lyme sufferers) and adrenal insufficiency overlap--for instance, fatigue, depression, digestive disorders, pain and cognitive problems are common in both-- if your problem is predominantly with the thyroid, weight gain will be more of an issue (as, when accompanied by adrenal insufficiency, people who are hypothyroid tend to lose weight, as a result of malabsorption). Also, following exercise, the person with adrenal fatigue will be exhausted afterwards, whereas the hypothyroid sufferer may actually feel a bit better. Consulting a complete list of symptoms and performing a few reliable tests will help you to ascertain a diagnosis.

To determine adrenal function, saliva tests, along with a clinical diagnosis, have thus far proven to be most reliable. Forget blood and urine and ACTH-stim tests. Most physicians don't even believe in adrenal insufficiency unless you have a case of Addison's (adrenal failure) because the latter tests are almost always wrong by displaying "normal" results in people whose
adrenals are really in trouble. I won't go into other reasons why you shouldn't even bother with such nonsense tests here, but suffice it to say, if you want to know the true state of your adrenals, order a saliva cortisol test from CanaryClub.org, and then learn to interpret the results by visiting the Yahoo! group Adrenal Fatigue, or by ordering G. Poesnecker's book, "Mastering Your Life."

Blood tests for the thyroid can be a tad more reliable than those used for the adrenals, but this depends upon who you are. If your body has trouble uptaking thyroid hormone into its cells; if it cannot convert T4 (inactive thyroid hormone) into T3 (active thyroid hormone), or you have adrenal fatigue, which adversely affects thyroid conversion, tissue uptake and thyroid response, then blood test results will tell you nothing. You may get any kind of results under the sun, which may or may not match the true condition of your thyroid and whether your body is actually using the hormone.

Even if you do a complete blood panel, the results will only reflect the amount of thyroid hormone that is circulating in your blood; they will not reveal how much that your body is actually using. In the case of adrenal insufficiency, the scenario is even worse. You may have high levels of thyroid hormone in your blood, but it's not because your body is producing enough of the stuff; it's because your body lacks the cortisol to help uptake the thyroid hormone into the cells, or cellular receptors are reticent to accept the hormone for other reasons.

Like the adrenal glands, the best way to test for thyroid function is with a do-it-yourself, at home test. This one is even simpler.

[Despite what Pharmafia-motivated physicians might tell you, taking your body's basal temperature is actually the best way to determine whether you are hypothyroid. This is done by placing a thermometer under your armpit first thing in the morning, for ten minutes, before you roll out of bed. Do this consecutively for about a week to obtain an average reading. If your temperature is 97.6 F or 36.5 C or less, you may be hypothyroid. This test, along with a clincial diagnosis of symptoms and perhaps a complete blood panel to confirm the diagnosis, is most appropriate. Sometimes, the blood tests help to ascertain a result but should not be used as a stand-alone to diagnose thyroid problems.

So once you have your test results and find a knowledgeable professional to help you interpret them, you can begin treatment.

Treating adrenal insufficiency I have found to be quite tricky. While taking adrenal glandular formulas may help some, not everyone benefits from them. Sometimes, the body rejects those that contain active cortisol, by shutting down its own cortisol production when it senses the presence of bovine or sheep cortisol in the blood. Response to synthetic cortisone may be better but higher doses must be used to compensate for whatever the body decides to stop producing, and synthetic cortisol can cause immune suppression and side effects when dosed improperly (which is a common occurrence). Glandular formulas may do the same, but they tend to be gentler than powerful, synthetic hormones such as hydrocortisone and prednisolone.
Yet, for those with moderately severe or severe adrenal insufficiency, taking a product containing cortisone may be beneficial, provided that appropriate doses (which are usually lower than those typically prescribed) are given.

As a basis, and as I have described in my book, "The Lyme Disease Survival Guide: Physical, Lifestyle and Emotional Strategies for Healing," the adrenals need lots of vitamin C and pantothenic acid, as well as a good, food-based multi-vitamin. Siberian ginseng can be helpful as an adrenal tonic but by itself, will not cure moderate to severe adrenal fatigue (as most supplements). Yet it can be a helpful adjunct to an adrenal fatigue protocol, as can rhodiola, which balances the endocrine system. A good quality licorice, such as Dr. Baschetti's (which is sold by the Clymer Healing and Research Center) can boost the adrenals by causing the body to retain cortisol longer than it normally would, but will not aid in cortisol production. Traditional chinese medicine (TCM), involving the use of other herbs to treat adrenal and other endocrine
problems may also be a good solution. Check out C. Willis' TCM adrenal fatigue protocol in the Files section of the Yahoo! group, Adrenal Fatigue.

Finally, avoiding stress, sugar and stimulants are essential for helping the adrenal glands to recover.

Now, on to the thyroid. Fortunately, treating this gland seems to be a bit easier than treating the adrenal glands, but it is not without its complications. As mentioned in my book, some Lyme disease sufferers have trouble converting inactive T4 hormone (which is what most synthetic thyroid hormone supplements are made of), into T3 (active thyroid), and therefore, either pure, bio-identical T3, or a combination product such as Armour (hormone that is made from porcine thyroid glands) must be taken, instead of the synthetic stuff that is so commonly prescribed.

Furthermore,the body, in addition to T4 and T3, also makes T2 and T1, which are slight variants of the other two hormones. These latter two comprise only a small portion of the body's thyroid hormone production, yet tests have shown that they may be more involved in the body's processes than previously thought. For instance, T2 has proven to be more effective in liver and lipid metabolism than T3, and is involved in increasing the metabolism of heart, muscle and brown adipose tissue. While Armour is said to contain only T4 and T3, because it comes from the tissue of a pig's thyroid, it may also include the lesser-known and oft-ignored T2, and T1, which could be of benefit. It most closely resembles, in any case, human thyroid. However, if your body produces excessive amounts of "reverse T3" (this can be ascertained by a blood test), you may want to consider pure, bio-identical T3, but bear in mind that some health care practitioners believe that pure T3 is harder on the heart and liver than Armour.

Some people opt to supplement their diet with iodine. While iodine is necessary for the thyroid, if you take too much, your thyroid may actually decrease the amount of hormone it makes in order to compensate for the excess. (Kind of like the adrenals when they sense the presence of supplemental cortisol in the blood). Hence, if you take a prescription thyroid hormone, it's probably a good idea not to supplement your diet with too much iodine, since the hormone should technically give your body close to what it needs. If you don't take hormone, then you will have to somehow ascertain how much iodine is beneficial for you, which is not necessarily the amount prescribed on the bottle. Pay attention to how you feel at different doses. If you decide to use iodine, choose a high-quality product such as Lugol's. Also, keep in mind that the basis of thyroid hormone is the amino acid L-tyrosine, so you may want to supplement this amino acid, along with iodine and plenty of minerals, which are all involved in thyroid hormone synthesis (especially selenium).

Just one final word about hypothyroidism. Flouride negatively affects thyroid function, so stay away from flouridated water, toothpaste and other sources. Believe it or not, tea is grown in flouride-rich soil, so consider the possibility that your tea (as well as coffee) may suppress your thyroid function. Stick with lemon water, unless you know how your tea is made

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vonneke
Berichten: 7127
Lid geworden op: Do 16 Jun 2005 20:57

Re: lyme en hormonen

Berichtdoor vonneke » Zo 23 Aug 2009 10:59

http://www.annals.org/cgi/content/abstract/114/10/914-a

Thyrotoxicosis Resembles Lyme Disease

To the Editors: The diagnosis of Lyme disease rests on both clinical (1) and serologic (2) findings. Patients living in endemic areas, however, may be treated for Lyme disease despite negative serologic findings. We have recently seen three such patients who actually suffered from undiagnosed thyrotoxicosis.

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